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Current Projects

The following is a list of the IDeA Center's current projects. Click on a section for additional information or to learn about the progress being made on a specific project.

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Anthropometry

Anthropometry is the study of the dimensions and abilities of the human body. The IDeA Center started a major long range program to establish a database on the anthropometry of wheeled mobility in 1999. This program was initiated as part of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Universal Design at Buffalo funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. The U.S. Access Board also began supporting the effort in 2001 and is now providing the major source of funds.

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Global Universal Design Commission, Inc.

Global Universal Design Commission, Inc., (GUDC) a not-for-profit corporation, was established to develop Universal Design (UD) standards for buildings, products and services. GUDC is currently developing UD voluntary consensus standards for commercial buildings, which will expand access to buildings for all people, regardless of physical stature and varying abilities. The approved UD standards will guide corporations and government entities in the creation of barrier-free facilities, providing diverse users with access to commerce, public services, entertainment and employment opportunities.

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Bridging the Gap: Increasing Access to Universal Design

The Bridging the Gap Project, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, aims to increase awareness and knowledge for the next generation of architects about design for a pluralistic population including those often underrepresented like people who have disabilities, health conditions, low incomes, older people and children. Bridging the Gap provides HBCU architecture departments an opportunity to develop their curricula on universal/inclusive design to improve the lives and welfare of America’s urban and rural underserved communities. At the same time, it offers the HBCU schools an opportunity to take a leadership role in the education of design professionals in this field.

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RERC on Accessible Public Transportation

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Accessible Public Transportation will research and develop methods to empower consumers and service providers in the design and evaluation of accessible transportation equipment, information services, and physical environments.

This Center is funded by grant number H133E080019 from the United States Department of Education through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. No endorsement should be assumed by NIDRR or the UnitedStates Government for the content contained on this website.

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RERC on UD and the Built Environment 2006-2010

The Center researches and develops critical tools for advancing the field of universal design and applies those tools to develop exemplary products and places through industry partnerships. Education and dissemination activities increase awareness of the RERC activities and universal design in general as well as improve capacity in research and practice. All these activities are founded on and guided by a model of "evidence based practice."

This Center is funded by grant number H133E050004 from the United States Department of Education through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. No endorsement should be assumed by NIDRR or the United States Government for the content contained on this website.

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RERC on UD and the Built Environment 2010

The 2010 RERC will create housing, public buildings, and communities that are more accessible for people with disabilities and safer, healthier, and socially sustainable for the general public. It will identify and fill research gaps and develop critical tools for advancing the field of universal design and apply those tools to develop widely adopted standards and products.

This Center is funded by grant number H133E050004 from the United States Department of Education through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. No endorsement should be assumed by NIDRR or the United States Government for the content contained on this website.

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Rural Aging in Place Initiative

Less than half of all U.S. communities are planning for the aging of their populations and rural models for aging in place are few. Policymakers and funders have focused on developing urban models although 21 percent of the U.S. population and 8 percent of New Yorkers live in rural areas. To fill this gap in policymaking and development of replicable models for rural aging in place, the IDeA Center is working with communities in two parts of the Adirondacks, New York State’s least populated area and home to some of its most isolated towns and communities.

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Universal Design Identity Project

Universal Design Identity Project investigates public perceptions and attitudes toward universal design. Understanding these perceptions and attitudes helps create a clear, unique, and identifiable, identity program and attendant graphic standard for universal design.

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Visitability

Visitability is based on the conviction that inclusion of basic architectural access features in all new homes is a civil and human right and improves livability for all. This project is a collaboration between the IDEA Center and Concrete Change.

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